Green Economy 2018-01-15T12:08:48+00:00

Green Economy

According to UNEP (2011), the definition of green economy is “one that results in improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. It is low carbon, resource efficient, and socially inclusive”.

Another definition for green economy offered by the Green Economy Coalition (a group of NGOs, trade union groups and others doing grassroots work on a green economy) succinctly defines green economy as “a resilient economy that provides a better quality of life for all within the ecological limits of the planet.”

Topic List

Biobased Processes & Implementation

March 19, 2018 | Wageningen University | English

After this course, you will be able to understand the potential of microorganisms for the production of biobased products, and explain how catalysis can contribute to a biobased economy. Also, you will understand commercial, financial and organizational aspects of running a biobased business, as well as the complexity of logistics of biobased value chains. In addition, you will be able to identify and qualitatively assess the major economic implications of different kind of regulations for the future of the bioeconomy.

 

After this course, you will be able to understand the potential of microorganisms for the production of biobased products, and explain how catalysis can contribute to a biobased economy. Also, you will understand commercial, financial and organizational aspects of running a biobased business, as well as the complexity of logistics of biobased value chains. In addition, you will be able to identify and qualitatively assess the major economic implications of different kind of regulations for the future of the bioeconomy.

 

Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

February 14, 2018 | Université catholique de Louvain | English

Introduction to Results Based Climate Finance (RBCF)

January 22, 2018 | World Bank Group | English

The UNFCCC’s twenty-first Conference of Parties (or COP21), held in December 2015, resulted in 186 countries agreeing to address climate change and set the foundation for the necessary transition of global economy towards a low-carbon pathway. As part of the Paris process, more than 180 countries submitted their pledges – the Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs – laying out the actions they will take to reduce emissions and increase resilience to climate change impacts. The significant investment needs embedded in the NDCs will have to be mobilized, and quickly and effectively channeled into climate related initiatives.

The UNFCCC’s twenty-first Conference of Parties (or COP21), held in December 2015, resulted in 186 countries agreeing to address climate change and set the foundation for the necessary transition of global economy towards a low-carbon pathway. As part of the Paris process, more than 180 countries submitted their pledges – the Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs – laying out the actions they will take to reduce emissions and increase resilience to climate change impacts. The significant investment needs embedded in the NDCs will have to be mobilized, and quickly and effectively channeled into climate related initiatives.

Circular Economy

December 27, 2017 | Wageningen University & Research | English

In this course, we take a systems approach to the circular economy, considering different stakeholder perspectives, their incentive structures, and their impacts on circular alternatives. The circular solutions will be identified by technological assessment using applied as well as emerging technologies. Since identifying and evaluating potential circular alternatives based on quantitative techniques is key in achieving sustainable solutions, you will also learn how to use life cycle assessment and agent-based modeling to assess the socio-technical and manageable challenges and environmental benefits of alternative solutions.

 

In this course, we take a systems approach to the circular economy, considering different stakeholder perspectives, their incentive structures, and their impacts on circular alternatives. The circular solutions will be identified by technological assessment using applied as well as emerging technologies. Since identifying and evaluating potential circular alternatives based on quantitative techniques is key in achieving sustainable solutions, you will also learn how to use life cycle assessment and agent-based modeling to assess the socio-technical and manageable challenges and environmental benefits of alternative solutions.

 

Essential Tools For The Low Carbon Economy

December 27, 2017 | The University of Queensland | English

This course will equip you with the knowledge and essential skills to manage the risks and opportunities of transitioning to the low carbon economy. Adopting the role of a key employee in a fictitious company, you will learn about different policy responses to climate change, how to measure your organization’s carbon footprint, how to compare projects based on emissions reduction and cost, and how to participate in an emissions trading scheme.

This course will equip you with the knowledge and essential skills to manage the risks and opportunities of transitioning to the low carbon economy. Adopting the role of a key employee in a fictitious company, you will learn about different policy responses to climate change, how to measure your organization’s carbon footprint, how to compare projects based on emissions reduction and cost, and how to participate in an emissions trading scheme.

Social Enterprise: Growing a Sustainable Business

December 19, 2017 | Middlesex University Business School | English

Through theory, practical information, and video case studies from around the world, this course helps you evaluate whether your social enterprise is sustainable or not. Also, it helps you develop a plan to take it to the next level by mapping your stakeholders, marketing your business, and managing change.

Through theory, practical information, and video case studies from around the world, this course helps you evaluate whether your social enterprise is sustainable or not. Also, it helps you develop a plan to take it to the next level by mapping your stakeholders, marketing your business, and managing change.

Business Futures: Sustainable Business Through Green HR

November 1, 2017 | RMIT University | English

This course will explore what constitutes sustainability from both ecological and business perspectives. The emergence of sustainable approaches to human resources, known as ‘Green HR’ will be investigated. Besides, various types of sustainability models will be identified.

Source:<a href=’https://www.123rf.com/profile_olegdudko’>olegdudko / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

This course will explore what constitutes sustainability from both ecological and business perspectives. The emergence of sustainable approaches to human resources, known as ‘Green HR’ will be investigated. Besides, various types of sustainability models will be identified.

Source:<a href=’https://www.123rf.com/profile_olegdudko’>olegdudko / 123RF Stock Photo</a>